What key do mezzo sopranos sing in?

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One of them is “Gusto do Estado,” with “Dolce” as the theme, and “Ave” as the refrain.

“We are at the highest point in the world. No one is capable of doing these things alone, no country is capable of these thoughts,” said Mr. da Silva. Mr. da Silva is the first one I’ve met who’s lived in the U.S. since the days it was a colonia, under the British, before the land was claimed by the United States.

He’s a native of Rio de Janeiro and a graduate of Universidade Municipal de São Paulo, which is one of the highest schools in the world in terms of the curriculum. For that reason, he is used to taking on complex texts and works.


“I am an artist,” he said. “I can think on so many levels.”

Nowadays my piano and his keyboard are the same. They are similar but radically different.

The one in the dorm room has a built-in music stand, and Mr. da Silva makes do with one piano. The one in my apartment is a more sophisticated setup. The soundboard is in the center of the room, with a boom mike in each corner.

He has three different keyboards. The one next to mine has several extra speakers and a speaker boom. He puts them on the same channel. The other two in his apartment are built on a shelf in a corner. He’s got a two-channel system.

But the one in my apartment is his best setup, because he has all the gear and a little extra room.

Mr. da Silva’s father taught the piano in the old days. My mom was an accomplished guitarist, so I also use her piano on the piano in my apartment.

He’s a little obsessive when it comes to the equipment. He gets a Yamaha DX7A sampler with a custom sound. I can use a Roland TDK-6.1 as the sequencer.

“What do you use it for?” I ask.

“Dance,” he says.

How often does he play?

“Never.”

He’s a pretty laid-back guy, though. He has the sort of quiet confidence you’d hope from a born leader. He has two children and keeps track of the time spent together on his phone.

“I tell my wife, ‘